125 Stories

125 Stories

125anniversary - CopyTo celebrate 125 years of a library in Belton, the Lena Armstrong Public Library invites patrons to share stories about the library. The initiative is called 125 Stories. The top 3 stories, selected by the Library Board, will be awarded gift cards:
  • 1st - $125
  • 2nd - $100
  • 3rd - $75. 
Submit stories using a Google form, in person at the library, or by email. We would like to add pictures to the page and encourage you to send pictures by email. 

Criteria
  1. Word Limit: Keep it concise and engaging, 500 words or less.
  2. Theme: Share a story that highlights the personal impact of the library on your life. It can be a specific memory, a favorite book, or a life-changing experience. Focus on how the library played a role in your journey.
  3. Format: Content is most important. Your submission can be a story, poem, or brief essay. Use your imagination.
  4. Photo: If possible, include a photo related to your story (submit by email). It can be a snapshot of you in the library or an image of a memorable book cover.
  5. Submission Deadline: Submission deadline is to be determined, likely this summer.
  6. Personal Connection: Express your personal connection to the library. Whether it's a childhood memory, a place of solace, or a source of inspiration, we encourage you to convey the emotional significance.
  7. Permission to Share: We reserve the right to share submitted stories as part of the anniversary celebration. This may include featuring stories on our website, in newsletters, on social media, or during special events.
  8. Editing Guidelines: We reserve the right to edit submissions for grammar, length, and clarity. This will help us to create a polished collection.
  9. Age: Submissions from patrons of all ages will be considered. We want a diverse collection of stories that reflect the library's impact across different generations.
  10. Submission Platform: Google form, email, or physical drop-off at the library, 301 E. 1st Avenue, whichever is most convenient.


125 Stories

Roscoe Harrison
The first black resident known to have a library card was a young boy named Roscoe Harrison, who charmed Librarian Lena Armstrong into giving him a card even though blacks were not permitted to use the library due to segregation. “She told me not to tell anybody about the card,” Harris recalled years later, while also admitting “I told everybody I had a library card from Miss Lena!” 


Sarah Gilleland
I wonder how many people were lucky to experience Mrs. Bertha McGhee and her summer reading program? She made all of us kids feel special. My brother and I still talk about the positive influence Miss McGhee had on us as kids. We loved visiting with her.